PERSONAL BLOG.

People call me various things. Teela, Teelar, Tee-tee, Teelch, Tuula.

Choir and opera person. History person (especially the American Revolution and the Civil War). I also like Greek Mythology. Various other things shall appear.

If there is something on my blog that triggers you and I do not tag it, PLEASE send me an ask to tell me what it is. You can be anonymous, or not. Whatever is comfy for you.

My ask is always open.

Have some cookies and tea and a blanket for your stay.

 

Fellow uterus-bearers-
Do you guys ever get the feeling like someone took a spoon and scooped out your uterus and ovaries? Like a hollow feeling, not quite painful, usually after a period of intense pain?

I just finished Grapes of Wrath
I feel like all the fight went out of me
I should be crying the way I feel now but there aren’t any tears coming

dontneedyourheroact:

what i love about mythbusters is that once they bust a myth they manipulate their variables until something finally explodes bc we all know why you’re really watching this show

ruinedchildhood:

me as a teacher

blackfeminism:

queenquong:

chubbycartwheels:

glam-pire:

kararikue:

You NEEDED Mermen of color on your dash, you just didn’t know it.

no I did

Now my tumblr is perfect.

!!!!!!!
if you haven’t already, i’m guess you wanna see this, sourcedumal and iridescent1
and mypurpleself

yesssss

blackfeminism:

queenquong:

chubbycartwheels:

glam-pire:

kararikue:

You NEEDED Mermen of color on your dash, you just didn’t know it.

no I did

Now my tumblr is perfect.

!!!!!!!

if you haven’t already, i’m guess you wanna see this, sourcedumal and iridescent1

and mypurpleself

yesssss

(Source: blackingzz)


So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

(Source: tfios-changed-my-life)

you-wish-you-had-this-url asked
I've been seeing a lot of people talk about Gus sounding really pretentious in the movie, do you think he sounds pretentious?

fishingboatproceeds:

I mean, that scene is word-for-word from the book, so don’t blame the movie! :) Yes, Gus is super pretentious at the start of the story. it’s a character flaw.

Gus wants to have a big and important and remembered life, and so he acts like he imagines people who have such lives act. So he’s, like, says-soliloquy-when-he-means-monologue pretentious, which is the most pretentious variety of pretension in all the world.

And then his performative, over-the-top, hyper-self-aware pretentiousness must fall away for him to really connect to Hazel, just as her fear of being a grenade must fall away. That’s what the novel is about. That is its plot.

Gus must make the opposite of the traditional heroic journey—he must start out strong and end up weak in order to reimagine what constitutes a rich and well-lived life.

Basically, a 20-second clip from the first five minutes of a movie is not the movie.

(Standard acknowledgement here that I might be wrong, that I am inevitably defensive of TFIOS, that it has many flaws, that there’s nothing wrong with critical discussion, and that a strong case could be made that I should not insert myself into these conversations at all.)

pre-raphaelisme:


The Black Brunswicker by John Everett Millais
The painting was inspired in part by the exploits of the Black Brunswickers, a volunteer corps of the Napoleonic Wars, during the Waterloo campaign. And in part by the contrasts of black broadcloth and pearl-white satin in a moment of tender conflict. The painting depicts a Brunswicker about to depart for battle. His sweetheart, wearing a ballgown, restrains him, trying to push the door closed, while he pulls it open. This suggests that the scene is inspired by the Duchess of Richmond’s ball on 15 June 1815, from which the officers departed to join troops at the Battle of Quatre Bras. In a letter to Millais’ wife, Effie Gray, Millais described his inspiration for the work, referring to a conversation with William Howard Russell, the war correspondent of The Times:



My subject appears to me, too, most fortunate, and Russell thinks it first-rate. It is connected with the Brunswick Cavalry at Waterloo…They were nearly annihilated but performed prodigies of valour… I have it all in my mind’s eye and feel confident that it will be a prodigious success. The costume and incident are so powerful that I am astonished it has never been touched upon before. Russell was quite struck with it, and he is the best man for knowing the public taste. Nothing could be kinder than his interest, and he is to set about getting all the information that is required.



The same letter states that he intends it to be “a perfect pendant to The Huguenot”, Millais’s first major success, which portrays a similar scene featuring two lovers gazing at each other longingly. Originally Millais intended the two paintings to be even more similar than they are by repeating the motif of the armband used in the earlier painting. He wanted the soldier to be wearing a black crepe mourning armband, with “the sweetheart of the young soldier sewing it around his arm”. The armband idea was quickly dropped as it does not appear in any extant preparatory drawings. Millais reduced the presence of Napoleon to an engraving after Jacques-Louis David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps, which is framed on the damask-hung wall, and which “perplexed the critics with the possible intricacies of cross purposes and rival jealousies” according to the reviewer from Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine. This refers to the fact that some critics took the print to imply that the female character was an admirer of Napoleon, and so she was trying to prevent her lover from joining the army for both personal and political reasons. As the critic of The Times surmised, “her reluctance is due in part to a romantic admiration for this great conquerer.” Other critics suggest the print was intended to allude to both the Waterloo campaign and to more recent events, particularly Napoleon III’s repetition of his predecessor’s crossing of the Alps by his attack on Austrian controlled Italy in 1859. Cr: Wikipedia

pre-raphaelisme:

The Black Brunswicker by John Everett Millais

The painting was inspired in part by the exploits of the Black Brunswickers, a volunteer corps of the Napoleonic Wars, during the Waterloo campaign. And in part by the contrasts of black broadcloth and pearl-white satin in a moment of tender conflict. The painting depicts a Brunswicker about to depart for battle. His sweetheart, wearing a ballgown, restrains him, trying to push the door closed, while he pulls it open. This suggests that the scene is inspired by the Duchess of Richmond’s ball on 15 June 1815, from which the officers departed to join troops at the Battle of Quatre Bras. In a letter to Millais’ wife, Effie Gray, Millais described his inspiration for the work, referring to a conversation with William Howard Russell, the war correspondent of The Times:

My subject appears to me, too, most fortunate, and Russell thinks it first-rate. It is connected with the Brunswick Cavalry at Waterloo…They were nearly annihilated but performed prodigies of valour… I have it all in my mind’s eye and feel confident that it will be a prodigious success. The costume and incident are so powerful that I am astonished it has never been touched upon before. Russell was quite struck with it, and he is the best man for knowing the public taste. Nothing could be kinder than his interest, and he is to set about getting all the information that is required.

The same letter states that he intends it to be “a perfect pendant to The Huguenot”, Millais’s first major success, which portrays a similar scene featuring two lovers gazing at each other longingly. Originally Millais intended the two paintings to be even more similar than they are by repeating the motif of the armband used in the earlier painting. He wanted the soldier to be wearing a black crepe mourning armband, with “the sweetheart of the young soldier sewing it around his arm”. The armband idea was quickly dropped as it does not appear in any extant preparatory drawings. Millais reduced the presence of Napoleon to an engraving after Jacques-Louis David’s Napoleon Crossing the Alps, which is framed on the damask-hung wall, and which “perplexed the critics with the possible intricacies of cross purposes and rival jealousies” according to the reviewer from Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine. This refers to the fact that some critics took the print to imply that the female character was an admirer of Napoleon, and so she was trying to prevent her lover from joining the army for both personal and political reasons. As the critic of The Times surmised, “her reluctance is due in part to a romantic admiration for this great conquerer.” Other critics suggest the print was intended to allude to both the Waterloo campaign and to more recent events, particularly Napoleon III’s repetition of his predecessor’s crossing of the Alps by his attack on Austrian controlled Italy in 1859. Cr: Wikipedia